RECLAIMING AN ECONOMY THAT WORKS FOR EVERYONE, NOT JUST THE WEALTHY

ABSTRACT: We need to reclaim our economy so it works for everyone, not just the wealthy. With different choices and policies that reflect a different set of values, our economy can once again be one where a rising tide lifts all boats, not just the yachts of the wealthiest.

The policy changes that are needed to support the middle and working class include:

  • Raise the minimum wage
  • Strengthen laws on equal pay for equal work
  • Strengthen labor laws and enforcement, including workers’ right to bargain collectively
  • Strengthen Social Security while protecting and encouraging pensions
  • Close corporate and individual income tax loopholes, and raise tax rates on unearned income
  • Ensure that trade treaties are fair to workers and citizens
  • Strengthen the Dodd-Frank financial reforms and reinstitute a small financial transaction tax
  • Create jobs and make needed investments in our infrastructure

We need new policies and programs that reflect values and choices that put the average citizen and worker first, rather than wealthy individuals and corporations. If some of these proposals resonate with you, contact your elected officials and tell them. A grassroots movement is needed to shift our economy from the current one that is working only for the wealthiest 10% to the one we used to have where everyone benefited from economic growth.

FULL POST: In my last post, I summarized policy choices that have undermined the middle and working class, largely based on a great speech Senator Elizabeth Warren gave recently. She states that it doesn’t have to be this way and spells out what we need to do to reclaim our economy so it works for everyone, not just the wealthy. [1] With different choices and policies that reflect a different set of values, our economy can once again be one where a rising tide lifts all boats, not just the yachts of the wealthiest.

The policies that undermined the middle and working class were justified by the theory of “trickle-down” or “supply-side” economics. It was used to justify large tax cuts for wealthy individuals and corporations because the theory said that the country could count on the biggest and richest corporations and the wealthiest individuals to share their growing wealth and create an economy that worked for everyone. The experience of the last 30 years has shown that President George H.W. Bush was right when he called this “voodoo economics.” Nonetheless, there are politicians today who still pledge allegiance to “trickle-down” economics, despite the fact, as Senator Warren states, that it has been shown to be the politics of helping the rich and powerful get more, while cutting off the legs of the middle class.

The set of values that should drive our policies include the following:

  • A person shouldn’t work full-time and be in poverty.
  • Women should receive equal pay for equal work.
  • Labor laws should be strengthened and enforced so that workers are
    • paid what they are due,
    • able to retire with dignity, and
    • able to bargain together as a group with employers for fair pay, benefits, and working conditions.
  • Our tax system should be fair and require wealthy individuals and corporation to pay their fair share. Workers shouldn’t pay higher income tax rates on their hard-earned income than the wealthy pay on their unearned income from investment gains and dividends.
  • The burden of student debt should be reduced.
  • Our trade policies should be fair for workers, creating jobs and raising wages in the U.S.
  • Big banks and financial corporations should not be too-big-to-fail, allowed to make risky investments with government insured deposits, or bailed out by taxpayers if they get into trouble.
  • Regulation and oversight should be enhanced, particularly of the big financial corporations, so consumers and our economy are protected from speculation and fraud.

The policy changes that are needed to support the middle and working class based on these values include:

  • Raise the minimum wage nationally. (Many states and cities are already doing this.)
  • Strengthen laws requiring and enforcing equal pay for equal work.
  • Strengthen labor laws and their enforcement, including workers’ right to form unions and bargain collectively so there is a balance of power between the workers and the employer during negotiations.
  • Strengthen Social Security while protecting and encouraging pensions, as well as personal and employer supported savings, such as 401(k)s.
  • Close corporate and individual income tax loopholes. For example, stop corporations and individuals from hiding income overseas to avoid paying taxes.
  • Raise tax rates on unearned income, including capital gains, dividends, and hedge fund mangers’ investment gains.
  • Allow students to refinance college loans at reduced interest rates and allow relief from student debt in bankruptcy.
  • Ensure that trade treaties are thoroughly debated in public and are fair to workers and citizens, balancing their interests with those of multi-national corporations.
  • Strengthen the Dodd-Frank financial reforms, as well as oversight and enforcement. Prevent financial corporations from gambling on risky investments with taxpayer insured deposits. Require too-big-to-fail corporations to split up into smaller entities.
  • Reinstitute a small financial transaction tax (for example, 0.5%) to discourage speculative trading and generate needed revenue.
  • Create jobs and make needed investments in our infrastructure by building roads, bridges, and schools; and investing in education and research.

While workers suffered after the 2008 economic collapse caused by out-of-control financial corporations, our politicians bailed out the corporations, often with no or few strings attached. Our politicians have also signed trade treaties and currently are negotiating new ones that are highly beneficial to multi-national corporations. Yet workers harmed by past policy changes and trade treaties, as well as homeowners who lost their homes and workers who lost their jobs in the 2008 collapse, have received little help and certainly have not been bailed out the way Wall Street was.

We need new policies and programs that reflect values and choices that put the average citizen and worker first, rather than wealthy individuals and corporations. I encourage you to listen to Warren’s speech if you haven’t already (just 23 minutes) or to read the press release. If some of these concerns or proposals resonate with you, contact your elected officials and tell them. A grassroots movement is needed to shift our economy from the current one that is working only for the wealthiest 10% to the one we used to have where everyone benefited from economic growth.

[1]     You can listen to and watch Warren’s 23 minute speech at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mY4uJJoQHEQ&noredirect=1. Or you can read the text in the press release her office put out at: http://www.warren.senate.gov/?p=press_release&id=696.

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