THE LEGACY OF WARREN’S RUN FOR PRESIDENT

As a policy wonk and someone who believes governments have an important role to play in addressing issues in our economy and society, I’m disappointed to see Sen. Elizabeth Warren drop out of the Democratic presidential race. Her highlighting of the work we need to do on social and economic justice will have a lasting legacy.

Warren has more clearly and specifically laid out a progressive vision for this country than anyone since President Franklin D. Roosevelt. She spelled out not only what that vision looked like but how to achieve it. She focused attention on the role of government, who it is supposed to work for in a democracy, and how those with wealth and power have undermined the basic principles and promise of our democracy. [1]

The detailed roadmap Warren put forth of how to solve problems in our society and economy, and to return to government of, by, and for the people will, fortunately, long outlive her presidential campaign. In February 2019, she put forth the first of her numerous plans to address our problems with a proposal to make affordable, high quality child care available for all children under school age. And she put forth her proposal for a wealth tax on ultra-millionaires as the way to pay for it and a number of her other plans.

Warren next presented a plan to break up and regulate the Big Tech corporations that are engaging in monopolistic practices and abusing the personal information they gather from all of us. She followed this up with a proposal to reverse decades of racist housing policies implemented by governments at all levels along with private sector lenders and the real estate industry. She followed up with plans to tackle the cost of higher education and student debt, a detailed plan to pay for health care for all, and policies to lessen the influence of big corporations and wealthy individuals in our policy making process.

Warren’s meticulous policy proposals set the agenda for the Democratic race for the presidential nomination. Hopefully, they will set the agenda for the final presidential race and future policy debates in Congress and governments at all levels.

Her proposals and arguments on the campaign trail hammered home the message that America’s problems are not inevitable but are the results of choices reflected in government policies. Warren highlighted how these decisions have been driven by the power of wealthy individuals and corporations, and how they have put their profits, power, and personal gain ahead of the common good.

Warren’s abilities as a storyteller made our problems and her solutions resonate with many Americans, as she wove her personal life story and America’s history into a clear, understandable, and persuasive narrative.

In keeping with her message that government needs to better serve the broad public, she raised the majority of her campaign’s $92 million (which, sadly, is necessary to run a competitive campaign these days) from small donors giving $200 or less. She refused to hold big ticket fundraisers where attendees make contributions in the thousands of dollars. She received more than half of her fundraising total from women, which is highly unusual if not unprecedented. This all demonstrated, as Sen. Sanders has as well, that a viable presidential campaign can be run without relying on large sums of money from wealthy individuals (who have vested, special interests). [2]

Warren has changed the way many Americans view our society and economy. Many people have learned about a wealth tax and the racial wealth gap for the first time, for example.

I believe she has changed the course of our country. Only time will tell how quickly and extensively her vision will affect the policies of our governments and the characteristics of our economy and society.

[1]      Voght, K., 3/5/20, “What Elizabeth Warren taught us,” Mother Jones (https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2020/03/what-elizabeth-warren-taught-us/)

[2]      Hasan, I., & Monnay, T., 3/5/20, “Low on cash and delegates, Warren ends her White House bid,” OpenSecrets.org, Center for Responsive Politics (https://www.opensecrets.org/news/2020/03/warren-ends-her-bid/)

4 comments

  1. carolyn fleiss · · Reply

    I voted for her John, not because I thought my vote would help her win but because I respect her and the hard work she put in as a candidate. I’m glad she will not be disappearing anytime soon. Carolyn

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    1. John A Lippitt · · Reply

      Carolyn, exactly. Maybe she’ll be Treasury Secretary if a Democrat wins! She’s still cranking out her well thought out and comprehensive plans. She just updated her recent plan on dealing with the corona virus. Take care, John

  2. Hi John,

    Thanks for talking about Elizabeth Warren…she is a great thinker…I read one of her books when I was still at Heller 20 years (gulp) ago!

    Thanks again…

    Tom

    “Aim High for Aphasia; another step in the call for action!”

    Johnny Appleseed of Aphasia Awareness

    50 States or Bust!

    Have Aphasia…Will Travel!

    Thomas G. Broussard, Jr., Ph.D.

    Stroke Educator, Inc.

    541 Domenico Circle

    St. Augustine, FL 32086

    207-798-1449

    tbroussa@comcast.net

    http://www.strokeeducator.com

    Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/StrokeEducatorInc

    Stroke Diary video- http://youtu.be/5jkq-YwWSJk

    Stroke Diary—Plasticity video- https://youtu.be/8O-m8kzTJk4

    Stroke Diary Vol 1- http://www.amazon.com/Stroke-Diary-Primer-Aphasia-Therapy/dp/1502978040

    Stroke Diary Vol 2- https://www.amazon.com/Stroke-Diary-Secret-Aphasia-Recovery/dp/0997965320

    Stroke Diary Vol 3- https://www.amazon.com/Stroke-Diary-Stories-Aphasia-Language/dp/0997965347

    Skype–tbroussa

    1. Thanks, Tom. I’m really sad to see her out of the race. It reminds me of Mike Dukakis’ run for president: a candidate that embodies what everyone says they want in an elected official but won’t vote for in the voting booth.

Comments and discussion are encouraged

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: